Re: This Improvisation Will Buy Time Alright But….



On Jan 11, 6:52 am, WTShaw <lure...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Jan 10, 9:06 am, tom st denis <t...@xxxxxxx> wrote:





On Jan 10, 8:29 am, adacrypt <austin.oby...@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Many thanks to every body who has subscribed to my new understanding
of what is going on in the real world of cryptology.

Understanding is perhaps the wrong word here.  Maybe "complete and
utter confusion" or "hysteria" fit better.

Your problem is you know jack-f'ing squat about computer science,
technology, and least of all cryptography.  You're claiming to try to
interpret things through some view that isn't at all how reality
works.

We're not using "control codes of ASCII" because they're NOT ASCII
MESSAGES.  If I use all 8 bits of a byte to store an MP3 audio file,
I'm not passing that through some "ascii" filter to store the data.
It's just bytes in a file somewhere.

But you go on "learning" things.

Tom

But, you can use some of those other codes for custom purposes since
text inspection might not reveal them to the casual viewer.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Hi Oldtimer,

Good to hear - all the best for 2012.

Can I run something past you.

You may have noticed the recent threads on the matter of kicking ASCII
into touch and going it alone with derived systems that may also use
byte representation to encrypt extraordinary data like images. audio,
embedded control signals and any others you care to mention.

I contend that although this may seem to be kicking ASCII into touch
that can never really happen because deep down within every
microprocessor (Intel, AMD or other) manufactured in the west or
possible world wide in any western computer, ASCII is there to stay as
a resident data enumeration type - all 0 to 255 incl. elements of it -
there is no escaping it - every key that is touched by any user
translates as an ASCII code point in corresponding machine code.

Customised systems that use other representations of data are merely
being screened as superimposed alternatives on the basic system but
are still processed as ASCII in the computer cpu.

I would appreciate your opinion but don't bother if you fear the
sleeping dogs of war that it may awaken.

I have had good treatment already from a few responsible readers in
this matter

- Best Wishes - adacrypt

.



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