Re: Strongest encryption algorithm



fermineutron wrote:
Peter van Liesdonk wrote:

There is no such concept as a password. If there would be a password as
you propose, then it would be all the info required to encrypt/decrypt,
and thus be the key. A brute force attack would just try any likely
password.

Let me explain what i ment by password and why i propose to use it:
What ever user enters either by keyboard or stored in a particular file
is a password. This can be a short sting. For examnple let is be 64
bits long. Now the Encryption/Decryption key is 2048 or more bits long
and deterministic translation of the password to a key is a time
consuming process. It is time consuming not because of a poor algorythm
but because the mathematical model connecting the two is difficult,
like large matrix inversion or simmilar. The purpose of doing this is
to give attacker 2 brute force routs to take:
1) Bruteforsing the password
2) Bruteforcing the key

While bruteforceing password requires significantly less trials, due to
difficulty of calculations involved, the attacker has little advantage
over bruteforcing the Large key space. At the same time using a short
password allows the legitimate user to remember it rather than storing
ity somewhere.


Perhaps you could/should learn some of the more common the terminology used in cryptology and use that.
.



Relevant Pages

  • Re: Strongest encryption algorithm
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  • Re: Strongest encryption algorithm
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