Re: Fingerprint as cryptokey



On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 22:17:29 -0400, kurt wismer <kurtw@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Are fprints superior to DNA analysis? Don't think so.

frankly, no biometric is particularly well suited for use as encryption
key material because none of them are particular secret.

Uh, then post your algorithms that simplify gait analysis.

On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 22:17:29 -0400, kurt wismer <kurtw@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

simplify? what has that got to do with it being secret or not?

Let's see. If something is simple, it is, by definition, less
secretive (in the data world that one of us lives in).

again, the concern is *secrecy* (not complexity or availability or
superiority relative to dna analysis based on some as yet undefined
criteria)... secrecy is required for generating crypto keys and
biometrics are generally not secret..

I'm sure, in your world, that is the case.

. the property they're supposed to
have is that of being non-transferable, and (when that ideal and certain
other requirements are met) that's good enough for certain applications,
but not for key generation...

See above.
.



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