Re: Barcode Email

From: David Taylor (davidt-news_at_yadt.co.uk)
Date: 07/26/05


Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:00:51 +0000 (UTC)

Ari Silversteinn <abcarisilverstein@yahoo.comxyz> wrote on Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:08:11 -0400:
>
> You type your text and a proprietary program (The Program) converts the
> text into a visible barcode that is, preferably, not viewed as an
> attachment (just a PGP is not seen as an attachment).

Why? What purpose does turning a textual e-mail into an image
(of a barcode or whatever), then transmitting that, serve?

> Send the email and
> either once received, the recipient induces the program that would
> automatically decode the barcode into standard, readable text or the
> barcode would self-decode.

Self-decode? Does it use keys, or does it decode it itself?

>In transit, the barcode would not be readable
> since it was encoded with The Program and its trade secret internal
> coding.

What if the other person had a copy of "The Program"? What if
they reverse engineered the encoding (which doesn't sound hard
if there's no key).
 
> We would wish to stay away from .exe files since many networks, ISPs and
> email providers refuse to allow them.

Congratulations. That's the only sensible thing I've found in this post.
 
> Inside the barcode could be stenographic images as well.
>
> If the recipient wishes, he could print and scan the barcode or even "gun"
> it while displayed on the screen. Or he could download a free viewer if he
> did not wish to create barcode emails.

Why would they wish to print or "gun" this magical barcode?
 
> The advantage here is that 8K of text (~ 70, 115 character lines or 115 ,
> 70 character lines) would be in a portable document file. That file could
> become a secure credential, resume, etc and transported around with ease
> and inexpense or passed through email without a great amount of overhead.

How does turning text into a barcode help anything?

Why not take a text file and encrypt it with pgp?

-- 
David Taylor