Re: /etc/master.passwd: No such file or directory



According to Joopmicroop <joopmicroop@xxxxxxxxx>:
First question, is there a file called /etc/master.passwd?

Yes the file suppose to be there other wise there wouldn't be a
problem. And if you look in the directory by using 'ls -acf /etc/'
(without the quotes you would see that there is a file called that way)
and because it's a file... You won't find it by pressing

ls /etc/master.passwd

like you showed because it's a file... He'll yust tell you the path and
doesn't say file not found...

But this should also give you the size of the file. If it is
zero, then something has eliminated the contents, while leaving the name
present. Otherwise it should show something like this:

On a Solaris system:
======================================================================
ls -la /etc/master.passwd
/etc/master.passwd: No such file or directory
======================================================================

and on an OpenBSD system:

======================================================================
curlmakr:csu 23:36:52 # ls -la /etc/shadow
ls: /etc/shadow: No such file or directory
======================================================================

In both cases, I choose names which I expected to not be present.

The "-l" option shows you the listing in the long format,
including permissions.

The "-a" option shows *all* files -- including those which are
normally suppressed because their names start with '.'.

But anyway if I try to search on the imac for 'ls /etc/' he tells me
that the whole directory is gone so not only master.passwd but that's
the first file he needed to start en just stoped there.
The job for /etc/passwd is there to remember
- the user login names
- a shadowed password
- the group identification number
- A discription of the user (mostly the full name)
- The home directory of the specified user, where he logs into if he
gets logged on
- The shell the user will use after been logged in (defauld bash withe
osx.3)
The file is a read only file so if you open it in vi you'll have to
change the administration rights also the group I think.

So now I anwerd all your questions I still don't know how I get the
directory /etc/ back...?

First off -- I believe that OS-X does some strange things to
hide some unix things from the normal GUI interface -- including the
/etc/directory. Those can only be seen when running in "Terminal".
(This based on a lot of long distance conversations with a friend who
has such a machine. I don't have one. You may also have to become root
to see things. And this requires a working password file.

However, a lot of it is similar to my OpenBSD systems.

First off -- my Sun Solaris system don't absolutely *require* a
/etc/shadow (the Solaris equivalent of /etc/master.passwd), as long as
the encrypted passwords are present in the /etc/passwd file. A program
called "pwconv" will generate the /etc/shadow from the /etc/passwd file,
moving the encrypted passwords from the one to the other. All of the
things which you mention as being present in /etc/master.passwd are
present in /etc/passwd, and /etc/shadow has extra things in /etc/shadow,
such as password expiration times.

Looking at the man pages for the OpenBSD, among other things,
there is a program called "pwd_mkdb" which will create database versions
of the password files (both /etc/passwd and /etc/master.passwd), and the
system can work happily from that.

Also -- the man page for pwd_mkdb says that /etc/master.passwd
is the main password file, with /etc/passwd being a copy in the v7 unix
format -- available for programs to determine what name is associated
with a userid.

The program "vipw" will invoke either vi, or your selected
editor, if it is indicated in the environment variable EDITOR. When you
complete editing the file, it will check for sanity (does the file
format make sense), and if so, it will work from there.

Have you considered trying "ls -ld /etc" to see what the
permissions are on /etc? It may be that it exists, but prohibits
listing to anyone other than the root account. (And if you can't become
root, you also probably can't repair a missing /etc/master.passwd file.)
Your only choice may be to re-install the OS, if enough information is
missing. (An alternative, if you knew enough about the system, would be
to remove the disk from the current system and mount it as a second disk
on another system, and make the necessary corrections there.

I think that you *really* need to find someone nearby who can
help you -- there are too many things to figure out which could be
operator error, or real problems with the installed system.

Good Luck,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@xxxxxxxxxxx> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
.



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