Re: router contains a built-in switch versus router without a built-in switch

From: Duane Arnold (notme_at_notme.com)
Date: 09/17/05


Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2005 01:13:47 GMT

CJT <abujlehc@prodigy.net> wrote in news:432B673D.60602@prodigy.net:

> Duane Arnold wrote:
>
>> jrefactors@hotmail.com wrote in
>> news:1126883449.566340.26660@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com:
>>
>>
>>>CJT wrote:
>>>
>>>>The combination might be cheaper than the two parts separately.
>>>>And then it's only one thing to plug in.
>>>>
>>>
>>>If I only want to connect to 3 PC in a LAN, the router has 4 ethernet
>>>ports and it can do the job. If I want to connect more than 4 PC,
>>>then I need a switch. This is the scenario of two parts separately.
>>>
>>>I still don't understand because router with built-in switch has 4
>>>ports also, how does it function as the combination of router and
>>>switch together?
>>>
>>>Here's different types of routers I looked at:
>>>
>>>http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?childpagename=US%2FLayout&pac
>>>k
>>>edargs=c%3DL_Product_C1%26cid%3D1118334622279&pagename=Linksys%2FCommo
>>>n %2FVisitorWrapper
>>>
>>>BEFSR41 EtherFast® Cable/DSL Router with 4-Port Switch V4.0 (4 ports)
>>>BEFSR11 EtherFast® Cable/DSL Router (1 port)
>>>BEFSR81 EtherFast® Cable/DSL Router with 8-Port Switch V3.0 (8 ports)
>>>
>>>Another question, if the router has more than 1 port, then it must be
>>>router with built-in switch. Is that correct assumption? Because the
>>>traditional broadband router should only has 1 port?
>>>
>>>
>>>please advise more... thanks!!
>>>
>>
>>
>> The links below explain connecting two Linksys routers together. It
>> doesn't matter which ones or if it's wired or a wireless router or
>> any brand name of routers for home usage like D-link, Netgear, Belkin
>> and whatever.
>>
>> The long version
>>
>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.ph
>> p? p_faqid=358&p_created=1084209764
>> &p_sid=FJfGf8Dh&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PS
>> ZwX
>> 3Jvd19jbnQ9MjM1JnBfcHJvZHM9MSwwJnBfY2F0cz0mcF9wdj0xLjE7Mi51MCZwX2N2PSZ
>> wX3
>> NlYXJjaF90eXBlPWFuc3dlcnMuc2VhcmNoX25sJnBfc2NmX2xhbmc9MSZwX3BhZ2U9MSZw
>> X3N lYXJjaF90ZXh0PXdpcmVsZXNzIHRvIHdpcmVk&p_li=&p_topview=1
>>
>> The short version
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/9nvq7
>>
>>
>> You disable the DHCP server on the router, then it's no longer a
>> router it's a switch.
>
> No, if you disable the router function (or just don't connect the WAN
> link), then it's no longer a router. It can still function as a DHCP
> server without being a router.

Well of course that's a given that you connect it to a LAN port on the
gateway router and DHCP is disabled on the second router that it is just
a switch. I don't recall any standalone *switches* that have DHCP.

And what your talking about above would be a double NAT-ed solution if
setup properly. I have never used a double NAT-ed solution but I think
that's what it is or could possibly be configured into but I could be
wrong.

Duane :)