Re: Hidden-code flaw in Windows renews worries over stealthly malware

From: Whoever (nobody_at_devnull.none)
Date: 09/03/05


Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2005 23:04:30 -0700


On Sat, 3 Sep 2005, Hairy One Kenobi wrote:

> "Shadus" <shadus@shadus.org> wrote in message
> news:HvydnXg-zJ7f9IXeRVn-sA@giganews.com...
>> On 2005-09-01, Jim Watt <jimwatt@aol.no_way> blabbed:
>>> I gave up on SCO because of editing in vi
>> Lol, vi (vim specifically) is my favorite editor. It's simple,
>> powerful, and does everything I could want out of an editor for source
>> code, text files, configs, etc. I can use emacs in a pinch, jed, jove,
>> pico, nano, whatever. I prefer vi, even use it in windows when I'm
>> forced to work there.
>>
>> To give up an entire os because you don't like/can't grasp its default
>> editor seems... eh nevermind, it speaks for itself.
>>
>>> All this cryptic stuff is very fine, but these days now
>>> storage is cheap its utility is outweighed by the trouble
>>> in learning it and getting it right.
>> I don't understand what you think is cryptic, especially since the
>> original thread regarded the registery if I remember right. The
>> original point if memory serves was that unix config files are much
>> simplier than the registry and safer too since a single change in one
>> value won't leave your machine in an unbootable state.
>
> LMAO on that one - VI is a perfectly reasonable line editor (first used 'em
> on Cyber mainframes), but a fairly poor excuse for the FSEs that emerged in
> the 1980s.

LMAO on that one. "ed" is the line editor, "vi" is the full screen editor.
vim is an incredibly powerful editor -- if you can learn how to use it.
Most people don't. And vim with config files is wonderful -- it
understands the syntax of many file types and highlights the various items
appropriately. If you are going to edit html files in a text editor, vim
is probably what you want to use.

But vi/vim's most powerful attribute is that it is available on just about
every *nix platform (although, for some strange reason, Gentoo uses pico
as its default).

Anyway, back to the original comment about the registry vs. config files:
yes some config files for *nix applications are complex, however, many are
quite simple and most contain detailed comments. I don't recall any
comments in the registry....



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