Re: BIOS password safer?

From: nemo outis (outis_at_erewhon.com)
Date: 07/04/04


Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2004 13:24:41 GMT

In article <8sgfe0hqqj06vtv15j41eeelg66mp9kide@4ax.com>, Mr Nobody <me@privacy.net> wrote:
>On Sat, 3 Jul 2004 20:18:22 -0700, "Toolman Tim"
><no.spam.for.tcm@my.email.is.invalid> wrote:
>
>><nemo outis@erewhon.com (nemo outis)> wrote in message
>>news:foKFc.18008$WB5.14182@pd7tw2no
>>>| In article <n8KdnRZM35Lx0HrdRVn-vg@brightview.com>, Mimic
>>>| <null@void.net> wrote:
>>>| Some BIOS passwords are quite difficult - I had to use a special
>>>| circuit and get data from Australia for a friend's IBM Thinkpad
>>>| to reset it. The machine was unusable until then.
>>>|
>>>| Of course, it was still easy to dump the contents of hard disk
>
>>I was wondering about that myself - the Dell laptops at work have a hard
>>drive password in CMOS as well as user/system passwords. Supposedly, the
>>hard drive won't read on *any* computer without the password. But I've never
>>had time to borrow the boss's laptop to test it <g>
>
>There must be a way of doing it unless the Dell HD is encrypted, which
>I doubt. All other password systems are just gateways - and you can
>always go over the wall if you know how.
>
>You might have to interfere with the electronics of the HD, or even
>remove the platters and put them into another drive, but if the data
>on the platters is stored in plaintext, there must be a way of getting
>at it if you have the determination and expertise.
>

I've had no experience with the Dell, but there are some weak and
primitive systems that will ust mess with the MBR. Needless to
say, that will only stop your kid sister.

Regards,