Re: secure email

From: Jamie Briant (dotnet2_at_exertris.com)
Date: 10/24/03


Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2003 11:24:29 +0000 (UTC)

Thats great, but why wont Outlook let me encrypt the outgoing email? It
says:

"Microsoft Outlook could not sign or encrypt this message because you have
no certifiacates which can be used to send from the e-mail address
<blah@blah.com>"

Why do *I* need a certificate when I am trying to encrypt an email using the
recipients key????

jamie

"Ralph A. Jones" <rajones@SPAM_ME_NOT_AT_tconl.com> wrote in message
news:Lq2mb.122$o92.120145@news.uswest.net...
> Jamie Briant wrote:
>
> > I've got this email which has been digitally signed, so I have the guys
> > public key. I want to send an encrypted email back. But, outlook wont
let me
> > because *I* dont have a certificate. Is this outlook, or will Mozilla,
> > Eudora, etc all do the same thing? Is it the whole protocol: it wont let
you
> > use someone elses public key unless you have a key of your own? Seems a
> > great way to make sure that no-one adopts secure email if you ask me.
> >
> > jamie
> >
> >
>
> I have been an email encryption advocate since the DOS PGP days when
> Phil Zimmerman (the author of PGP) was still being sued by the Justice
> Department for providing military-grade encryption to the masses (and,
> unfortunately for Phil, enemies of his home country the United States).
> In my experience over the years it has been proven to me over and over
> again that it takes a true geek/paranoid (of which I am proud to call
> myself) to "buy into" email encryption. Your average, Joe Blow user
> could hardly be less interested in email encryption because: a) it adds
> two or three clicks to processing email, whether you are using PGP or an
> S/MIME-enabled email client like O/OE; or, b) obtaining and installing a
> digital certificate or generating a PGP key set is beyond the computer
> capabilities/interests of most.
>
> Your friend appears to have joined the relatively small community of
> geek/paranoids. I invite you to join us. As others have suggested, you
> can pick up a Thawte certificate for free (http://www.thawte.com -- even
> though their "public trust" or "notary public" system probably inhibits
> the timid).
>
> Last time I checked (although this may have been changed in the most
> recent version), Netscape verions 6.x/7.x (Mozilla iterations) did *NOT*
> properly support S/MIME.
>