Re: Locking Cisco Router

From: Meritt James (meritt_james@bah.com)
Date: 11/22/02

  • Next message: Wolf, Glenn: "RE: IP to MAC mapping"
    Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 09:39:24 -0500
    From: "Meritt James" <meritt_james@bah.com>
    To: fat@users.sourceforge.net
    
    

    Steel cages are cheap, already manufactured, and well ventilated as well
    as similarly used...

    Jim

    "Mark (fat)" wrote:
    >
    > Not that I have heard of. Physical access is root access and all that.
    >
    > What about a vented steel box with a key? Depending on your reasons
    > (untrusted employees or if it lives in a customers site that you don't
    > trust) this would be a cheap and sturdy (pardon the pun) solution.
    >
    > Mark(fat)
    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: DeGennaro, Gregory [mailto:Gregory_DeGennaro@csaa.com]
    > Sent: 19 November 2002 00:15
    > To: 'matt'; ziggy@one2net.co.ug; security-basics@securityfocus.com
    > Subject: RE: Locking Cisco Router
    >
    > Dave,
    >
    > I may be wrong on this because I have not heard nor research it at
    > Cisco.
    > >From what I know, it is not possible to totally lock a router down
    > >without
    > password recovery (ctrl-break)unless you implement physical security.
    > However, remember that no can password recover over the Internet but
    > need direct access to the router. Why would you want to stop it because
    > if you do and you forget your password or whatever, it may be more
    > frustrating and costly than implementing physical security.
    >
    > I did a "quick" search and nothing for routers.
    >
    > Greg
    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: matt [mailto:tool8185@adelphia.net]
    > Sent: Sunday, November 17, 2002 7:34 AM
    > To: ziggy@one2net.co.ug; security-basics@securityfocus.com
    > Subject: RE: Locking Cisco Router
    >
    > Why would you want to do that? Is it company owned or privately owned?
    > If company owned, then if you quit or get fired, only you know the
    > password to the router itself else the next expert will have to
    > reconfigure the router changing the bits so that the password no longer
    > exists creating time... Now if privately owned, as long as the password
    > is never mentioned to anyone, there isn't any problems. And what version
    > are you with? 250*, higher? Lower? from where I can see, your answer is
    > no but I could be wrong...
    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: David Lubowa [mailto:ziggy@one2net.co.ug]
    > Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2002 9:50 AM
    > To: security-basics@securityfocus.com
    > Subject: Locking Cisco Router
    >
    > is it possible to lock a cisco router to a point that even a password
    > recovery cant work to enter the router.
    >
    > cheers
    > David Ziggy Lubowa
    > Network Engineer
    > One2net (U)
    > web: www.one2net.co.ug
    > Tel: +256 41 345466

    -- 
    James W. Meritt CISSP, CISA
    Booz | Allen | Hamilton
    phone: (410) 684-6566
    


    Relevant Pages

    • RE: Locking Cisco Router
      ... it is not possible to totally lock a router down without ... password recovery unless you implement physical security. ... Subject: Locking Cisco Router ...
      (Security-Basics)
    • RE: Locking Cisco Router
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    • RE: Locking Cisco Router
      ... Subject: Locking Cisco Router ... password recovery unless you implement physical security. ...
      (Security-Basics)
    • RE: Locking Cisco Router
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