RE: Strange SNMP probes suddenly appearing

From: David Gillett (gillettdavid_at_fhda.edu)
Date: 11/21/03

  • Next message: Bill McCarty: "Re: Chunked encoding worm on tcp/80"
    To: "'Jeff Kell'" <jeff-kell@utc.edu>, "'General DShield Discussion List'" <list@dshield.org>, "'Incidents'" <incidents@securityfocus.com>
    Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 08:56:56 -0800
    
    

      Some of the HP JetDirect client/drivers, especially older versions
    with default configs, like to scan their world using SNMP and query
    anything that will take a connection to learn if it is a printer.
    We have a few of them on our campus; we *hope* that non-obvious
    community names are keeping our network equipment from spending much
    time or effort talking to these clients.

      The handful of "unauthorized" airports that I know about don't
    seem to attract nearly as many virus-infested clients as the public
    (secured) ones....

    Dave Gillett

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: Jeff Kell [mailto:jeff-kell@utc.edu]
    > Sent: November 20, 2003 19:06
    > To: General DShield Discussion List; Incidents
    > Subject: Strange SNMP probes suddenly appearing
    >
    >
    > Starting yesterday afternoon, I had a local student lab
    > machine that was
    > attempting to SNMP query our core router (it's default
    > gateway), and due
    > to a misconfiguration on the access-layer switch, I couldn't shut the
    > port down, so I simply ACL'ed the address to Null. It was sending
    > queries every 10-15 seconds (somewhat irregularly). It was a Windows
    > machine (answered nbtscan) and nmap only revealed a NetBIOS
    > port open,
    > nothing else. Suspecting a proxy, I scanned the PIX logs for
    > the last
    > 24 hours and there was absolutely no traffic registered to/from the
    > internet, and no active NAT xlate slot either.
    >
    > This morning, another machine in a different building and
    > subnet started
    > roughly the same thing. I was able to isolate this one at the access
    > layer and shut it down, but not before scanning it -- not
    > Windows, but a
    > Macintosh, with no even remotely interesting ports.
    >
    > I received a call from a professor in the building, and turns
    > out he had
    > setup (unbeknownst to us) some Apple Airport access points in the
    > building, and we zapped the port the Airport was using. He also
    > reported another Airport was down, and checking history it
    > was shutdown
    > for Nachi (so it was Windows) but he could not identify
    > either the IP or
    > Mac address of that incident.
    >
    > After requesting that he make his Airports a closed SSID with a
    > non-trivial password, I brought both ports back up. Kaboom,
    > it started
    > again. And another machine (in yet ANOTHER building) joined
    > in briefly,
    > then disappeared, and a new machine with a different IP started in.
    >
    > I then turned the original problem address back on (removed ACL) and
    > kaboom, it started again. So now there were five incidents. Three
    > known to be coming from Airport clients, one strongly
    > suspected of also
    > being an Airport client, and the last we have no clue. We had 2
    > Windows, 2 Macintosh, and 1 unknown.
    >
    > I then headed off to the known Airport problem, found the associated
    > access point, hooked in a cheap hub inline and plugged in a
    > Linux laptop
    > with ethereal. But the only capture now was irrelevant (IGMP group
    > advertisements) - the SNMP had stopped. A watched pot never boils.
    >
    > Is this ringing a bell with anyone? I'm stumped. It isn't
    > coming from
    > the internet (we do strict ingress/egress anti-spoofing on
    > every subnet
    > and at the border router). Doesn't seem like a virus since
    > whatever it
    > is has demonstrated itself to be cross-platform. The Airport is
    > strongly suspected (we did find one of the offending machines, and it
    > was a faculty Mac laptop not doing anything fishy when I got there).
    >
    > Jeff Kell
    > Univ of Tennessee at Chattanooga
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------
    > -------------
    > --------------------------------------------------------------
    > --------------
    >

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  • Next message: Bill McCarty: "Re: Chunked encoding worm on tcp/80"

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