RE: S-1-5-21...



Hi, the Sid is shown because of the unavailable user account, either from
the domain or locally. Just remove the permissions.

Remco

-----Original Message-----
From: listbounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:listbounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of Charles Hardin
Sent: maandag 21 juli 2008 20:51
To: Erik Boles
Cc: Dennis Li; Red Cat; focus-ms@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: S-1-5-21...

You guys are missing the part that he said its COMPUTERNAME\none. This
means its a local account, nothing to do with AD. Im not that familiar
with vista users but I would not be suprised if this was some sort of
system generated account.

Charles Hardin


On Mon, Jul 21, 2008 at 2:37 PM, Erik Boles <eboles@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Also -- if the user is deleted from A-D that had access to that folder it
will show the SID rather than the name of the user as that container for the
user still exists, it just doesn't have a name any longer.
Erik





-----Original Message-----
From: listbounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:listbounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Dennis Li
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 11:30 AM
To: Red Cat
Cc: focus-ms@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: S-1-5-21...

Hi,

Normal, the user like 'S-1-5....' is a domain account. After your
computer is added into a domain (AD), the administrator account of the
domain is added to your local administrators group automatically. And
when you browse the security property of the folder, OS will query the
real name of that domain user. Before the query is done, you'll see
the name is 'S-x-x-xxx'.

Dennis

On Tue, Jul 22, 2008 at 12:56 AM, Red Cat <redcat9876@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Hey,

I have a question on something I saw on my computer today. I'm on a
Windows Vista. I was looking at some of the "properties" of some
folders in my "Public" folder and clicked on the "Security" tab. Then
I noticed my usual login user, "Everyone", and one other user, whose
id seemed to be S-1-5-21...and some numbers. Then after a couple
moments it turned into the user, "None" with (My computer name\None)
right next to it. I looked at the permissions it was given and
apparently it was given "Special Permissions." I was pretty sure I
didn't and never had created a user named "None". But I still checked
the Users folder to see if there was indeed a user named "None". There
wasn't. I even checked to see if there were any hidden users using the
"view hidden folder option", but there was no uesr by the name of
"None". I looked on google for some time but all I managed to find was
that it could possibly be a remnant from a past OS or something. But
this computer had Vista installed on it when I got it. Also, it might
be some sort of guest that was made for my computer or something. My
own speculation is that it has something to do with the fact that I
used Cygwin to open up a tarball and create this folder. Anyway, what
does this user mean? Why does it have special permissions? Is it some
sort of sign that I have a back door somewhere on my computer or that
I'm being keylogged or something? Thanks in advance.




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