RE: MS Exchange



Since we're talking about Exchange (and hopefully Outlook, by
extension), you can use "Permissions" to restrict what a person can do,
but this only applies to Exch-routed mail.
Once it's part of the SMTP stream, it's a free-for-all, baby!

Jim Harrison
I absolutely hate "the customer can stand on their left foot, hold one
hand over their head and chant "booga-wonka-whee!" while pressing
CTRL-ALT-WIN-PrtScn-SrlLk twice in rapid succession three times" answers
to technical issues...


-----Original Message-----
From: Kirby Boteler [mailto:Kirby.Boteler@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2006 2:41 PM
To: Steveb@xxxxxxxxxx; thor@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx; focus-ms@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: MS Exchange

In this regard, do you guys know of any software available that will
restrict a recipient from forwarding an email? Is this possible?

________________________________

From: Steveb@xxxxxxxxxx [mailto:Steveb@xxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Fri 7/28/2006 2:04 PM
To: thor@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx; focus-ms@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: MS Exchange



I agree with Thor on this one. It's a waste of time putting those
"legal disclaimers" on your emails. If you are afraid that an
unintended recipient may see the email, then it's in your best interest
not to send it.

The only way that something like this would be legally binding is if the
email is encrypted and the recipient must accept that agreement before
decrypting the contents.

The way that it's used today is much the same as blurting out phrases in
a crowded supermarket and then afterwards, telling everyone around that
they can't listen to what you just told them or repeat it in any way or
you'll bring legal action against them. How crazy is that?!

Whoever puts these things on their emails are surely not thinking the
logic through enough.

Thank you,

Steve Bostedor
Bozteck President
http://www.bozteck.com



-----Original Message-----
From: Thor (Hammer of God) [mailto:thor@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 1:36 PM
To: Focus-MS
Subject: Re: MS Exchange


Just as a matter of curiosity, does anyone have any *real* examples of
where those annoying "legal disclaimers" have provided any actual legal
protection or any evidentiary value?

Most of the ones I've seen are insipidly stupid, saying things like "if
you have received this email in error, or are not the intended
recipient, you may not view, forward, print, or do anything for that
matter." Of course, you have to read the damn thing to get to the part
where it says you can't read it. And who defines "intended recipient?"
My server intended for me to get it, so I must be the intended
recipient. Or am I to be held legally liable for determining what the
intent of the original sender was? It all seems like a colossal waste
of time to me.

t


On 7/28/06 6:51 AM, "Tupker, Mike" <mtupker@xxxxxxxxxxx> spoketh to all:

I've been looking into this a little as well. The cheapest way to do
it that I've found, if you are using exchange, is with an SMTP event
sink.
Many spam filters that I've seen have the ability to append text to
emails as well. The only one that I can think of off hand is GFI Mail
Essentials. http://gfi.com/mes/

I'm not sure if these would allow you to pull info from AD though. I
hope this helps a little.


Mike Tupker

-----Original Message-----
From: dave kleiman [mailto:dave@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2006 4:48 PM
To: focus-ms@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: MS Exchange


Can anyone recommend a auto-signature application that adds signatures

to outgoing email and those annoying legal disclaimers?

It needs to black the user from making changes to the sig /
disclaimer.

Additionally, it needs to pull variables from AD (e.g. Organization,
Title,
Department)

Most important, it needs to work! I have tried a couple and they
crashed and burned, either the sig did not pull AD info properly or
the user could override it.


Respectfully,

Dave Kleiman


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