RE: PGP and Outlook

From: Brian A. Reiter (breiter_at_wolfereiter.com)
Date: 01/15/05

  • Next message: Don Gray: "RE: local admin vs group policy and apps..."
    To: <halln@otc.edu>, <focus-ms@securityfocus.com>
    Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 22:47:42 -0500
    
    
    

    > Outlook supports digital IDs from Geotrust and Verisign,
    > but I would like to find something that will let our students
    > participate in using the digital signatures without having to
    > pay for one and with the adjunct faculty we hire on a per
    > semester basis, the benefit of using digital signatures would
    > be overcome by the cost.

    MIT provides a free version of the commercially licensed PGP for Win32
    [http://www.pgp.com]. I have tried the MIT PGP 6.5 distribution (which
    includes a plug-in for Outlook) [http://web.mit.edu/network/pgp.html] but it
    did not work properly unless the login account on the Windows box is a
    member of the Administrators group.

    I also tried the GNU Privacy Guard (GPG) plug-in for Outlook
    [http://www3.gdata.de/gpg/download.html] which depends on GPG for Win32
    [http://www.gnupg.org/(en)/download/index.html]. This plug-in simply didn't
    work for me at all and the user interface was broken, perhaps also not
    designed to run as a non-admin.

    On the other hand S/MIME support is built right in to Outlook and most other
    email clients. The problem is the cost of having a trusted certificate
    authority generate keys for the client. I have found Thawte Freemail "web of
    trust" to be a good solution. Perhaps it will work for your situation.

    Thawte will issue S/MIME certificates free-of-charge. Basic certificates are
    free and only certify the email address. There is a web-based personal
    certificate manager for revoking and issuing new certificates.

    There is also a mechanism for acquiring an account that identifies a real
    identity instead of just an email address, but it requires that an applicant
    be certified by other previously certified account holders in his/her
    location. Hence, "web of trust". In practice, this is a lot of rigmarole and
    I wonder how useful for most applications.

    [http://www.thawte.com/wot/]

    Brian A. Reiter
    WolfeReiter, LLC [http://www.wolfereiter.com]

    
    



  • Next message: Don Gray: "RE: local admin vs group policy and apps..."

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