Re: port forwarding

From: Greg Norris (haphazard_at_kc.rr.com)
Date: 12/04/04

  • Next message: Melanie.Berg_at_bafin.de: "Problem with scp"
    Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 09:49:02 -0600
    To: Rainer Lay <rainer.lay@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>
    
    
    

    Yes, Linux (and Unix) servers use shared sockets by default... no
    redirect should occur, unless you throw Multi-Threaded Server (MTS) into
    the mix. It's a more robust implementation than on Windows, however, in
    that you can stop the listener without affecting remote connections
    (again, assuming no MTS).

    On Sat, Dec 04, 2004 at 09:37:54AM +0100, Rainer Lay wrote:
    > Hi Greg!
    >
    > this sounds promising!
    > I will have a look at this USE_SHARED_SOCKET stuff next week, when I can
    > test it again.
    >
    > BTW, since this works on Linux, do you know it Linux is using shared
    > sockets by default? And if I stop the listener on Linux, will I also
    > loose remote connections?
    >
    > kind regards,
    > Rainer

    
    



  • Next message: Melanie.Berg_at_bafin.de: "Problem with scp"

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